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Butcherbird

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Recently observed and photographed was this butcherbird (Cracticus torquatus) feeding a jacky lizard (Amphibolurus muricatus) to its young. The clever butcherbird wedged the head of the lizard in the fork of a branch (as shown in the photos) so that it could tear at the lizards skin.

Photos by Harrison Warne.

Paul W

Nest hunting Goannas

Harrison Warne is a skilled young photographer and recently he has acquired a GoPro camera and he has shared with us the brilliant footage he took of a pair of Goannas inspecting an anthill nesting site. Harrison had observed the area and knew these goannas were around , so he placed the camera to capture images of the pair investigating the site (and the camera!) Steve Sass a reptile expert says he thinks this may be the first video of this interaction between the male and the female.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dXwH4g5qvKQ

Congratulations Harrison and thanks for sharing this with everyone.

Paul W

What are you going to do about it?
Photo Paul Whittock

Lace Monitor                                        Photo John Van Der Heul

Lace Monitor Photo John Van Der Heul

 

 

Hunting Reef Heron by Georgia Poyner

2013 photocomp winners announced

We have been blown away by all the great photos that have been submitted for our first competition.

There were 284 entries overall over 9 categories. The highest number of entries was in the Birds category, with 88 entries and the least number in Nightlife with only 4.

This is the overall winner of the competition – Georgia Poyner from Narooma (who is only 13!)

Georgia Poyner 13

Hunting Reef Heron
This heron was hunting around Narooma boat ramp, when I photographed it catching dinner! I used a canon powershot SX50

Have a look at the 2013 winners in the page on the left and see the high level quality of these winners. Also note all the Highly Commended entries which show how hard it was for our judges to choose the winners!

Thanks to everyone who has been involved, particularly the judges.

This was our first competition, but the level of interest ensures that we will have another next year. If you have any suggestions that will help us make the competition better, do write to us below. We do know we did not allow enough time for the competition, so next year we will have more time between closing the competition and announcing the winners. What do you think of the categories? Some people sent in photos of a very small size so the judges couldn’t see them in detail, so next time we will ask particularly that entries are within a good tolerance range. We also think we need to look for funds for more prizes this year we could only award a prize for the overall winner, and there were many others who deserved more than our certificate of excellence. Any ideas?

We look forward to hearing from you and any volunteers for running the competition next year will be welcome.

Don’t forget to send us your good photos for the website during the year – everyone is always interested to share your interesting sightings.

Once again thanks to all contributors  – you are amazing!

 

Black Reef Leatherjacket (Eubalichthys bucephalus)  spotted by Danie Ondinae  Photo Robyn Wimbush

Unusual visitors to the Blue Pool

Danie Ondinae  spotted two of these fish in the Blue Pool a few days ago. Michael McMaster agreed with her identification and we asked Robyn Wimbush if she could manage to get a photograph. Here is is – Teamwork!

Michael says they usually hang around in pairs. They are quite big – poss. 20 cm body length – and very distinctive

Black Reef Leatherjacket (Eubalichthys bucephalus)  spotted by Danie Ondinae  Photo Robyn Wimbush

Black Reef Leatherjacket (Eubalichthys bucephalus) spotted by Danie Ondinae Photo Robyn Wimbush

Latest tick advice

Thanks to Danie Ondinea who has forwarded this new link :

http://www.aabr.org.au/aabrs-tick-guide-now-available/

The Aust Assoc of Bush Regenerators (AABR) which I belong to have recently put all their tick information from various newsletters together in a pdf document. It has all the contact details for tick removal devices, info about new effective insect repellants, and how we can contribute to the research and lots more. Danie thought some Atlas users might find it useful. Many thanks Danie.

Pod of Killer whales sighted at Mowarry

John Smythe reported a great sighting at Mowarry point yesterday. He and his mate were just resting in the boat during their day’s abalone fishing when a large male Killer whale came up right next to the boat. This was followed by a small one and then five others surfaced as they swam past.

Sadly John did not have time to get his camera running before they were out of range. What a treat!